A History of Domestic Work and Worker Organizing

AUTHOR: National Domestic Workers Alliance

SUBJECT: BIPOC women, chattel slavery, structural racism, sexism, xenophobia, immigration, poor job quality, workforce, occupational segregation

Making it Work: Care, Blackness, and Generational Values

AUTHOR: SADE DOZAN

SUBJECT: economy, care crisis, occupational segregation, structural racism, sexism, wages & benefits, career mobility, BIPOC women, poor job quality

Unionization could help home health care workers with wages, experts say

Unionization could help home health care workers with wages, experts say For Susie Young, the days before she was a unionized caregiver weren’t ones to cheer about.   “Before the union came in, we had nothing,” she said. “No training. Forget about a paid holiday or vacation. … There’s many workers in this country today… Continue reading Unionization could help home health care workers with wages, experts say

When Public Investments Benefit Black People, White Elites Historically Work Overtime To Stop It

When Public Investments Benefit Black People, White Elites Historically Work Overtime To Stop It As Congress rushes to deliver bills to make crucial investments in infrastructure, jobs and families, much resistance is coming from those who pretend to fret over budget deficits and the federal debt. These irresponsible and dangerous arguments about the debt and… Continue reading When Public Investments Benefit Black People, White Elites Historically Work Overtime To Stop It

PHI Releases New Annual Data on the U.S. Direct Care Workforce

PHI Releases New Annual Data on the U.S. Direct Care Workforce NEW YORK — In 2020, as this country began grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic, direct care workers nationwide continued to struggle in poverty-level jobs across all long-term care settings, according to a new report from PHI, the nation’s leading expert on the direct care… Continue reading PHI Releases New Annual Data on the U.S. Direct Care Workforce

Women in health care are at a breaking point — and they’re leaving

Women in health care are at a breaking point — and they’re leaving Julie Conboy Russo had been a nurse for almost 40 years. She didn’t want to leave the field, but she didn’t feel she had a choice.   In November, COVID-19 cases were climbing nationally. Russo, who at the time worked in a… Continue reading Women in health care are at a breaking point — and they’re leaving

Barriers for Black women set U.S. economy back by $500 billion, report finds

Barriers for Black women set U.S. economy back by $500 billion, report finds The wage gap and barriers to economic mobility have not only set Black women’s advancement back, but also depressed the United States economy by about $507 billion over the past six decades, according to a new report from financial services firm S&P… Continue reading Barriers for Black women set U.S. economy back by $500 billion, report finds

To Achieve Equitable Quality Of Care In Nursing Homes, Address Key Workforce Challenges

AUTHOR: Jacqueline Lantsman Milena Berhane James Hernandez

SUBJECT: racial equity, safe staffing, poor job quality, nursing homes, pandemic, occupational segregation, turnvover, career mobility, wages & benefits, BIPOC women, essential workers, care crisis

Nursing Home Safety During COVID: Staff Shortages

AUTHOR: Teresa Murray, U.S. Pirg Education Fund

SUBJECT: safe staffing, poor job quality, nursing homes, pandemic, occupational segregation, turnvover, career mobility, wages & benefits, BIPOC women, essential workers, care crisis

It’s Time to Care – The Economic Case for Investing in a Care Infrastructure

AUTHOR: Lenore M. Palladino and Rakeen Mabud

SUBJECT: care crisis, financing solutions, care infrastructure, economy, policy development, occupational segregation, quality care, poor job quality